Posts tagged urban intervention

Ten New Historical Markers
“In 2007 a group of Pittsburgh-based artists, activists, and amateur historians coalesced around their interest in the often- buried history of radicalism in the United States. Perturbed by the lack of visibility and appropriate perspective given to important moments of resistance reflected in the city’s existing historical markers, they formed the Howling Mob Society to research and design a series of new public signs.”

Ten New Historical Markers

In 2007 a group of Pittsburgh-based artists, activists, and amateur historians coalesced around their interest in the often- buried history of radicalism in the United States. Perturbed by the lack of visibility and appropriate perspective given to important moments of resistance reflected in the city’s existing historical markers, they formed the Howling Mob Society to research and design a series of new public signs.”

The Phone Booth Book Share project is just that: an informal library located in old phone booths. Whether the phones are active or useful in today’s mobile-phone-dominated society, the structures are largely still there. The Department of Urban Betterment took it upon themselves to spearhead this effort, popping up in New York City and beyond.

The Phone Booth Book Share project is just that: an informal library located in old phone booths. Whether the phones are active or useful in today’s mobile-phone-dominated society, the structures are largely still there. The Department of Urban Betterment took it upon themselves to spearhead this effort, popping up in New York City and beyond.

Just a sample of the documentation from the presentation of Design Thinking’s final project last week, Lunchjoy Fountain. More to come, including specific re-caps of student projects and excerpts from written reflections of the event.
Above photo: Taken by Lea Loo, featuring Ethan Allen Smith and Tom Cober leading a boat race with a group of kids from the 4th Avenue food carts.

Just a sample of the documentation from the presentation of Design Thinking’s final project last week, Lunchjoy Fountain. More to come, including specific re-caps of student projects and excerpts from written reflections of the event.

Above photo: Taken by Lea Loo, featuring Ethan Allen Smith and Tom Cober leading a boat race with a group of kids from the 4th Avenue food carts.

The students of Design Thinking at Portland State University are proud to present an afternoon of urban interventions intended to activate, invigorate and investigate the Lovejoy Fountain.
The projects will be presented on site and injected into the environment, one that is rich with historical and cultural context. Designed by celebrated landscape architect Lawrence Halprin as part of the Portland Open Space Sequence in 1966, the fountain and its surroundings are embedded within the city of Portland’s South Auditorium Urban Renewal District, and are part of a complex and varied saga that illuminates an important chapter in Portland’s land use history. The student projects will engage with this history, as well as the publics who presently occupy and use the space.
This is an exercise in creative placemaking, a collective effort in site-specific engagement. 
Want more information? Look here! 

The students of Design Thinking at Portland State University are proud to present an afternoon of urban interventions intended to activate, invigorate and investigate the Lovejoy Fountain.

The projects will be presented on site and injected into the environment, one that is rich with historical and cultural context. Designed by celebrated landscape architect Lawrence Halprin as part of the Portland Open Space Sequence in 1966, the fountain and its surroundings are embedded within the city of Portland’s South Auditorium Urban Renewal District, and are part of a complex and varied saga that illuminates an important chapter in Portland’s land use history. The student projects will engage with this history, as well as the publics who presently occupy and use the space.

This is an exercise in creative placemaking, a collective effort in site-specific engagement. 

Want more information? Look here! 

Hmm! Will you be an active part of your intervention? Does your project have a performative element to it? A large, text-heavy element?

Start thinking about what defines your project. What is its purpose? Its intention? It’s mode of delivery?

alecshao:

Endre Tot - Outdoor Tests (1980)

prostheticknowledge:

The Billboard Art Project 

Roadside digital LED displays used to display unique art for short amount of time. Above is a piece put together by Anthony Antonellis in Detroit:

The Billboard Art Project is taking over roadside digital LED billboards to turn them into free public art venues for 24 hours or more.

Those in-your-face and colorful canvases that you see as you sit stuck in traffic are turned over to local and international artists for a little break from everyday advertising, presenting larger-than-life art in glowing colors.

Catch a glimpse from your car as you drive by, or hang out for awhile and watch the show with other artists and onlookers.

You won’t know what is coming next as different artists explore this medium, with the electronic canvas morphing every 6-10 seconds.

More about the Billboard Art Project can be found at it’s website here. More photos of Anthony’s piece can be found in this Flickr set here

Check out the Flickr pool that documents all of the International Parking Day installations, wherein people repurpose parking spots for different uses. 
(via live music! | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

Check out the Flickr pool that documents all of the International Parking Day installations, wherein people repurpose parking spots for different uses. 

(via live music! | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

Check out Park(ing) Day, an international event that reclaims urban parking spaces for public space. 
Browse this Flickr pool containing pictures from temporary mini parks around the country.
The city of San Francisco has recently changed their permitting process to make it easier for people and businesses to make a semi-permanent “parklet” in the spirit of the parks that happen because of Park(ing) Day. It’s awesome how an international, collaborative art project had real-world impact at the city level.

Check out Park(ing) Day, an international event that reclaims urban parking spaces for public space. 

Browse this Flickr pool containing pictures from temporary mini parks around the country.

The city of San Francisco has recently changed their permitting process to make it easier for people and businesses to make a semi-permanent “parklet” in the spirit of the parks that happen because of Park(ing) Day. It’s awesome how an international, collaborative art project had real-world impact at the city level.