Posts tagged student work

Documentation of the GOOD Ideas for Portland event and student presentations at ADX on March 16.

Thank you to Ryan Bush and Justin Flood for these photographs!

See more here.

GOOD Ideas for Cities: Student response by Paige Lehmann

PSU graphic design student Paige Lehmann presented a project alongside the rest of Team Rescue at the GOOD Ideas for Portland event at ADX on March 16. Here is her response to the experience, it continues after the jump. I’ll be posting bits and pieces of student work from last term on this blog. Stay tuned for more! 

We were standing in front of a crowd of over 100 people. The lights were down but for a projector pointed at us, making us bright while the crowd ebbed into a sea of empty faces. I faltered; we had some technical difficulties with figuring out our slides, and my fear of not entertaining people soaked through. And then, in the distance, I saw them: a pair of bright glasses. They were Jason Sturgill’s. He came to the presentation! Those glasses were uber-reassuring, and I picked up the stroke and went on. That was, for me, one of the defining moments of our presentation. 

I can’t say that I wasn’t nervous. I can’t say that I didn’t practice all the time, in weird places. Like while driving. While taking a bath. In front of the TV. I bartered: five minutes of practice and I can watch Arrested Development. I can’t say that we didn’t work really hard for this. And I can’t say that all of our work seemed worth it. But somehow, it was. We pulled it off, for the most part. I felt paralyzed without my notes, and I almost lost them right before we went up (left them at the wine bar, with the wine and the fancy cheese and the empty donut hole bowl). 

GOOD Ideas for Cities: Team Good Times

For their final project in Nicole Lavelle’s Design Thinking class at Portland State University, student teams identified, researched and designed solutions to urban challenges unique to Portland. In conjunction with GOOD Ideas for Cities, the students presented their solutions at a public event called GOOD Ideas for Portland. This series of posts documents those presentations. Find more information about the project and event here!

Team: Team Good Times
Members: Corbin Lamont, Gregor Holzmann, Collin May

Challenge: Portlanders hibernate. Parks and spaces that are bustling with activity during the summer are almost vacant for more half the year. What can we do to bring the community together during winter for safe, fun, all-ages events?

Solution: Team Good Times looked to themselves and their friends for inspiration for their urban challenge: Portland is wet, cold and dreary in the winter. Most of us stay inside and watch Netflix. What could get people out into Portland during the soggy winter months? The team devised a modular tent system to create dry, heated spaces within some of the city’s many parks. The tents would pop up in partnership with local businesses, who would care for the indoor parks in exchange for the use of the space. Free haircuts, poetry workshops, dinner parties and study hours are just a few of the uses Team Good Times proposed for their series of tent parks.

Presentation: See the complete presentation after the jump!

GOOD Ideas for Portland: Team Transportation

For their final project in Nicole Lavelle’s Design Thinking class at Portland State University, student teams identified, researched and designed solutions to urban challenges unique to Portland. In conjunction with GOOD Ideas for Cities, the students presented their solutions at a public event called GOOD Ideas for Portland. This series of posts documents those presentations. Find more information about the project and event here!

Team: Team Transport
Members: Alie Kouzoukian, Ruben Cadena, Gavin Van Houten

Challenge: Trimet is facing an enormous budget shortfall. Reductions are being planned for September 2012 that will affect all aspects of the public transportation system, impacting many Portland citizens. How can revenues be increased to make sure that Trimet can continue to provide affordable and reliable service for all? 

Solution: Team Transport embarked on a rigorous research process, engaging the public to seek opinions and gauge impact of public transportation in Portland . They approached their challenge with a  three-tiered solution. First, they suggested improving the experience of the ride by making Trimet FUN. Vending machines, ride free days and wifi on all trains would make riding the bus more enjoyable. Second, they devised a series of incentive-based approaches to encourage more riders, rethinking the function of the ticket. And finally…the blackout! Team Transport proposed taking away service for one day to highlight the importance of a functioning public transportation system in the city. They argued: “Sometimes, you only know the value of something when it is taken away.”

Presentation: See the complete presentation after the jump!

GOOD Ideas for Portland: Team Rescue

For their final project in Nicole Lavelle’s Design Thinking class at Portland State University, student teams identified, researched and designed solutions to urban challenges unique to Portland. In conjunction with GOOD Ideas for Cities, the students presented their solutions at a public event called GOOD Ideas for Portland. This series of posts documents those presentations. Find more information about the project and event here!

Team: Team Rescue
Members: Paige Lehmann, Jesse Weeg, Yoshimi Kawabata

Challenge: Portland’s Emergency Alert system relies heavily on telecommunications and, while their last alert test was successful, it took twice as long as predicted. At the same time, few Portlanders are prepared for an emergency. How can we both improve Portland’s alert system and prepare our community in case an emergency strikes? 

Solution: Team Rescue took on the challenge of preparing Portlanders for a natural disaster as well as thinking about improvements to the city-wide disaster alert system. Using the existing infrastructure of the Trimet public transportation system, Team Rescue transformed busses and trains into mobile rescue units. They designed a summer festival on the waterfront wherein the cost of admission gave each attendee an emergency preparedness kit. The team wrapped up their presentation by handing out checklists to the crowd to help them prepare their own kits for a natural disaster.

Presentation: See the complete presentation after the jump!

GOOD Ideas for Portland: Front Yard Project

For their final project in Nicole Lavelle’s Design Thinking class at Portland State University, student teams identified, researched and designed solutions to urban challenges unique to Portland. In conjunction with GOOD Ideas for Cities, the students presented their solutions at a public event called GOOD Ideas for Portland. This series of posts documents those presentations. Find more information about the project and event here!


Team: The Front Yard Project
Members
Joel Stein, Lyndsay Ediger, Nathan Sonenfeld

Challenge: The Willamette River is an attractive natural feature of Portland. It runs right through our city, but still isn’t a source of local pride or a site for activity. How then, do we turn the Willamette River into Portland’s “front yard,” an inspiring place of community for Portlanders to use and socialize with others?

SolutionThe Front Yard project looked at the Willamette River as a site for engagement, and set out to understand how to increase the value of the beautiful natural feature in the hearts and minds of Portlanders. Their solution proposed a number of alternative uses for the river, each designed to get more people to the water. Floating gardens, swing sets, water taxis and a system of lights would, they argued, get instill a sense of civic pride in the average Portlander.

Presentation: See the complete presentation after the jump!

GOOD Ideas for Portland: Bags of Fun

For their final project in Nicole Lavelle’s Design Thinking class at Portland State University, student teams identified, researched and designed solutions to urban challenges unique to Portland. In conjunction with GOOD Ideas for Cities, the students presented their solutions at a public event called GOOD Ideas for Portland. This series of posts documents those presentations. Find more information about the project and event here!

Team: Bags of Fun
Members: Andy Moser, Doug Sherwood, Devin Courtright

Challenge: Many communities have worked hard to outlaw single-use plastic bags, yet people are still using them. Just one person reusing a bag for their lifetime could keep 22,000 plastic bags out of the landfill. Changing habits is hard. How do we help people shift their behavior and reuse bags?

Solution: Bags of Fun approached their challenge with humor, engaging audiences of all ages. In order to instill good habits in youth, the Bags of Fun team created a campaign based on Bagman, a super hero with a bag for a head. Bagman encourages kids to bring bags with them when they leave the house, and to nag their parents to do the same. The team developed games for kids to pick up trash, framed under the guise of destroying the evil Dr. Plasto and his plastic bag minions. Partnerships with local elementary schools to offer parents and kids incentives rounded out the proposal.

Presentation: See the complete presentation after the jump!

Love how Corbin’s Design Thinking class project is living on in the real world long past the class…nice work Corbin!
alittlelikefreedom:

Your magik is real.

Love how Corbin’s Design Thinking class project is living on in the real world long past the class…nice work Corbin!

alittlelikefreedom:

Your magik is real.

Gregor, Collin & Corbin GOOD Ideas

COMMUNITY & PUBLIC SPACE: Inclusive Nightlife

Portland doesn’t offer nightlife for a board of people, what can we do to bring the community together in a safe and fun way? 

TRANSPORTATION: Make Public Transportation sexier

Public transportation is an still unattractive option to a lot of commuters, what can we do to increase it’s appeal? 

ENVIRONMENT & PUBLIC SPACE: People not following smoking laws

Smokers currently ignore smoking ordinances in relation to public space, what can we do to increase their appliance to laws and public health? 

FOOD: Awareness of food sources

There is disconnect between people and their food sources, how can people learn where their food comes from? 

SOCIAL JUSTICE: Increase social equality 

There is still discrimination that people face in Portland as minority social groups, how can we increase equality for all people?