Posts tagged design and the world

Very interesting! Power of the people > design choices made by governments

fuckyeahpublicspace:

June 2012- several thousand people gathered in Brussels for giant picnic to advocate/demand more public space and accessability for pedestrians and cyclists in their city. From the polis blog:

“The open space in front of the Stock Exchange, right in the heart of Brussels, is officially called a square (plein or place). In reality, people only have a sidewalk a bit wider than average to stroll beside a four-lane thoroughfare that bisects the city center north to south.

The “square” is usually unpleasant because of car exhaust and engine roars. Last Sunday at noon, however, residents — mostly families — invaded the public space with a picnic.”

sources:
http://www.thepolisblog.org/2012/06/brussels-residents-picnic-to-reclaim.html
http://instagr.am/p/LsG6zvOl80/
http://twitter.com/CeciliaVerh/status/211781205023141889/photo/1

Go watch this video, made by W+K New York as part of a multi-disciplinary collaborative team working as part of MOMA’s Foreclosed exhibition series. 

Wieden+Kennedy New York collaborated with architects from WORKac to create an installation for a featured exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York. Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream is an exploration of new architectural possibilities for cities and suburbs in the aftermath of the recent foreclosure crisis. Five teams were challenged by MoMA to envision new housing and transportation infrastructures that could catalyze urban transformation, particularly in the country’s suburbs…Instead of using the video to reiterate the model and the summary or develop the typical fly-through video, W+K and WORKac used the video component as a marketing opportunity for Nature City. Creating real estate ads for the development elevated the project above the hypothetical to the realm of the possible. Together, they made Nature City feel as if it were shovel-ready.”

How is the role of the designer shifting? How is the role of design in the world changing?

Megan Deal asked 29 friends to answer that question. Today she published her first submission. Take a look. 

morethanthisblog:

Last winter I put out a call to 29 friends around the globe to address the question of how the role of design and the designer may be shifting. The following was submitted by Pernilla Hagbert, a recently appointed Ph.D. candidate studying “homes for tomorrow,” a continuation of her Master thesis work which posits that our contemporary image of home is unsustainable when looking at global restraints on natural, human and financial resources.

Penny and I met in Hale County, Alabama in 2009, while she was designing and building at the Rural Studio.

Read More

Creativity + Capitalism = Economic Model of the Future

An excellent series of thoughts from Megan Deal, a designer and educator working in Detroit. Megan illuminates a current shift in design practice that is allowing the discipline to expand into new and diverse fields within the world. 

Read through this (it’s not too long!) and consider the ways in which designers can function in different scenarios and contexts. 

morethanthisblog:

In his article, Designers are the New Drivers of American Entrepreneurialism (October 2011), Bruce Nussbaum suggests that the melding of design with startup culture is leading innovation and raising the success rate of venture capital as high as 80%. Nussbaum cites several reoccurring patterns advancing in recent years to support this notion, including small design/innovation consultancies like Smart Design and IDEO, now developing and selling more of their own products, alongside several innovative startups being spawned by entrepreneurs with design degrees, like Tumblr, Vimeo and Airbnb. Several other examples that fall under this latter category come to mind as well, like Holstee, Dear Coffee I Love You, Best Made Co., Scout Books, and Field Notes.

Read More

Week One Wrap-Up

Thank you all for your excellent conversation this week! It seems that we have all found some new things to inspire us and lead us through our first project. As we move through different themes over the next few weeks, keep in mind our discussions regarding Design and the world. Remember that design is all around us; nearly everything we touch, see, hear or smell is arguably a result of a design process. Remember to observe. Look around. Think about what you see. 

I look forward to reconvening next week and talking about Design and art! Look for posts over the weekend relating to that topic. 

A reminder of what’s due for Tuesday:

Please read Art’s Little Brother by Rick Poynor and be ready to discuss in class. Remember to print out the reading and bring a physical copy to class. No computers! As you read the article, consider the following: How is art functional? How is design expressive? How does context play into this dichotomy?

Narrow your research from The List down to three items. Further your research on these people or organizations. Make three Tumblr posts, one about each topic. These posts must be on the blog before our class meeting on Tuesday at 9am. Remember to sign your post with your name! Each post must include: 1+ image, a short description of the topic, your explanation of why you chose the topic, and, if applicable, a description of one or two projects that caught your eye. You do not need to turn in a hard copy this time.

The next few posts will feature research done by some of your classmates on topics from The List. Submit your links, thoughts, research and images here! Remember to sign your posts with your name!

See you all on Tuesday!

Since this week we’re talking about Design and the World, I think it’s important to mention Bruce Mau’s book and exhibition project, Massive Change. The back of the book cover sums it up nicely: “It’s not about the world of design, it’s about the design of the world.”

The project dissects different design problems, realities and potential solutions in a variety of areas such as movement, energy, materials, military, and living.

This book is definitely worth your time if you’re excited to consider the world around you as a design laboratory.

www.massivechange.com


Bruce Mau Design is an interdisciplinary studio based in New York City and Toronto. They describe themselves as a “design and innovation studio centered on purpose and optimism.”
Bruce Mau has developed a design manifesto of sorts entitled the “Incomplete Manifesto for Growth.” At this point it contains 43 directives. Check it out here. 
Some favorites:

3. Process is more important than outcome.
12. Slow down.
15. Ask stupid questions.
32. Listen carefully.
33. Take field trips.

What are your favorites?

Bruce Mau Design is an interdisciplinary studio based in New York City and Toronto. They describe themselves as a “design and innovation studio centered on purpose and optimism.”

Bruce Mau has developed a design manifesto of sorts entitled the “Incomplete Manifesto for Growth.” At this point it contains 43 directives. Check it out here

Some favorites:

3. Process is more important than outcome.

12. Slow down.

15. Ask stupid questions.

32. Listen carefully.

33. Take field trips.

What are your favorites?

Breaking A Habit: Sister Corita - NOWNESS

This is an excellent video about how to see art in everyday life, which translates for us. How do you see design in everyday life? Where do you look? What might you be missing?

Look! Learn!

Thanks for an excellent discussion in class today, everyone! It was really inspiring to see you all jump right into dissecting the world around us and looking for instances of design. In light of our discussion today, I wanted to share the work of the artist Daniel Eatock with you, who is a very seasoned observer of the world around him.

Some people might call Daniel Eatock an artist, and some people might call him a designer. I’m not sure which one I’d call him, but that’s okay. Sometimes the things that inspire you have nothing to do with design, and that’s not only okay but probably a good thing.

His Picture of the Week project (featured here) is one that I really love. He collects images of commonplace objects, occurrences and situations that show us his way of looking at the world. By elevating the everyday, this project helps you realize that things that may seem totally boring are in fact really amazing. I’m more interested in this project because of how it teaches me to look at the world around me.

Other projects of note:

Walker Price Label Gift Wrap

Do Not Touch

Earth Bound Sky Bound

Permutations

Vandalized Trees Reoriented

In what ways do you see Eatock’s work intersecting with the world at large?