Posts tagged design and art

This is an awesome collaborative project from Temporary Services and IC-98 called It Is Always Like This. It explores the mobility of communication and relies on participation from community members and passers by. Check out more of Temporary Services’ public projects here.
halfletterpress:

Two page spread from Swop Projects, by Andrea Creuz & Lise Skou showing a project by IC-98 and Temporary Services

This is an awesome collaborative project from Temporary Services and IC-98 called It Is Always Like This. It explores the mobility of communication and relies on participation from community members and passers by. Check out more of Temporary Services’ public projects here.

halfletterpress:

Two page spread from Swop Projects, by Andrea Creuz & Lise Skou showing a project by IC-98 and Temporary Services


“The designer of today re-establishes the long-lost contact between art and the public, between living people and art as a living thing. Instead of pictures for the drawing room, electric gadgets for the kitchen. There should be no such thing as art divorced from life, with beautiful things to look at and hideous things to use. If what we use every day is made with art, and not thrown together by chance or caprice, then we shall have nothing to hide.” —Bruno Munari, in Design as Art

Get this book! If you’re interested in further exploring the relationship between design and art, I’d recommend adding this to your library. 

“The designer of today re-establishes the long-lost contact between art and the public, between living people and art as a living thing. Instead of pictures for the drawing room, electric gadgets for the kitchen. There should be no such thing as art divorced from life, with beautiful things to look at and hideous things to use. If what we use every day is made with art, and not thrown together by chance or caprice, then we shall have nothing to hide.” —Bruno Munari, in Design as Art

Get this book! If you’re interested in further exploring the relationship between design and art, I’d recommend adding this to your library. 

Sarah Baugh is a Portland-based designer whose work we’ll be referencing in this class. I encourage you to follow her Tumblr, which offers an interesting glimpse into her practice. Well, and it’s also called practice. I’m not sure if Sarah would call her self an artist, primarily, or a designer, primarily, but her creative output and process certainly seems to pull from both kinds of work.
This post is about process.
p-r-a-c-t-i-c-e:

When I first came here I had an idea of what I wanted to work on, but I also knew that, for me personally, it would be hard to know in advance, without ever being in Green River, what I wanted to work on. So I spent the first couple of weeks just kind of taking everything in. I actually felt a little overwhelmed. There is just so much here with the landscape and the dynamics of a small town. I’m from a very rural place, but I’ve spent the last six years in an urban environment. So readjusting to that took a moment. I rode my bike around. I talked to melon farmers. I talked to melon pickers. I ate melons. I went to the library. I took part in what was happening here at Epicenter. I thought that I wanted to look at one aspect of life in Green River in depth. I thought that I wanted to look at farming, specifically melons, because they are so important here, economically yes, but they are also one of those things that bind people together here. It’s something everyone has in common. And I wanted to explore the relationship between melons and the physical environment. What factors made it possible for people to grow melons here and how has this ultimately shaped the experience of living in Green River and calling this place home?
But the more I got into this, the more I realized that I kept wanting to take a step back and that I didn’t want to be that specific or come to any type of conclusion. I wanted to do a project that mirrored my experience here. I realized that a month is a such a short time and I know so little. Everything was coming at me in little bits and pieces, from all these different directions. There was what I could see, the town itself and the surrounding landscape. All of this is new. There is what is happening now. I would get bits of stories here and there. And then there is everything that has happened here in the past. I began to get a picture of this place, but it was fragmented, and I knew it would never be anywhere near complete. 
So I began to go to the local archive. I just wanted to be surrounded by preexisting information. And I liked the fact that the archive, any archive, collects information and doesn’t necessary do anything with it. That’s not the point, the point is to keep this information from disappearing into the past and making it accessible to the public. So I’ve been gathering documents in the way that I had previously been experiencing this place physically. I want to put these things into a new context and hopefully see them in a new light. I want to present what I’ve found in a way that doesn’t overtly create a narrative, but still has these narrative threads hidden inside, kind of waiting to be uncovered, but not forcing any one version of events. I want to make copies of copies and kind of perpetuate this idea that the history of a place is indeed fragmented and a bit fuzzy and coming from all these different sources and each source has a point of view, even if it’s trying to be completely objective. 
This project is process driven. I want it to feel a little unfinished, using copies of copies and playing with layers of source material. Office supplies. Cheap, abundant, and available resources. Allow for mistakes. Rapid prototyping. Rapid experimentation. Visible process. No outcome. A patchwork history. Impressions. Amateur historian. Curious observer. Gatherer. Pick and choose. Create more questions. Partial image. Unresolved. My hope is that the viewer finds some bit of interesting information that they may or may not explore further. I don’t want to even try to present a full picture of the history of Green River. I want to present fragments. I want to tell a story with other people’s facts. I want to tell a story with stories that other people told using other people’s facts. 

Sarah Baugh is a Portland-based designer whose work we’ll be referencing in this class. I encourage you to follow her Tumblr, which offers an interesting glimpse into her practice. Well, and it’s also called practice. I’m not sure if Sarah would call her self an artist, primarily, or a designer, primarily, but her creative output and process certainly seems to pull from both kinds of work.

This post is about process.

p-r-a-c-t-i-c-e:

When I first came here I had an idea of what I wanted to work on, but I also knew that, for me personally, it would be hard to know in advance, without ever being in Green River, what I wanted to work on. So I spent the first couple of weeks just kind of taking everything in. I actually felt a little overwhelmed. There is just so much here with the landscape and the dynamics of a small town. I’m from a very rural place, but I’ve spent the last six years in an urban environment. So readjusting to that took a moment. I rode my bike around. I talked to melon farmers. I talked to melon pickers. I ate melons. I went to the library. I took part in what was happening here at Epicenter. I thought that I wanted to look at one aspect of life in Green River in depth. I thought that I wanted to look at farming, specifically melons, because they are so important here, economically yes, but they are also one of those things that bind people together here. It’s something everyone has in common. And I wanted to explore the relationship between melons and the physical environment. What factors made it possible for people to grow melons here and how has this ultimately shaped the experience of living in Green River and calling this place home?

But the more I got into this, the more I realized that I kept wanting to take a step back and that I didn’t want to be that specific or come to any type of conclusion. I wanted to do a project that mirrored my experience here. I realized that a month is a such a short time and I know so little. Everything was coming at me in little bits and pieces, from all these different directions. There was what I could see, the town itself and the surrounding landscape. All of this is new. There is what is happening now. I would get bits of stories here and there. And then there is everything that has happened here in the past. I began to get a picture of this place, but it was fragmented, and I knew it would never be anywhere near complete. 

So I began to go to the local archive. I just wanted to be surrounded by preexisting information. And I liked the fact that the archive, any archive, collects information and doesn’t necessary do anything with it. That’s not the point, the point is to keep this information from disappearing into the past and making it accessible to the public. So I’ve been gathering documents in the way that I had previously been experiencing this place physically. I want to put these things into a new context and hopefully see them in a new light. I want to present what I’ve found in a way that doesn’t overtly create a narrative, but still has these narrative threads hidden inside, kind of waiting to be uncovered, but not forcing any one version of events. I want to make copies of copies and kind of perpetuate this idea that the history of a place is indeed fragmented and a bit fuzzy and coming from all these different sources and each source has a point of view, even if it’s trying to be completely objective. 

This project is process driven. I want it to feel a little unfinished, using copies of copies and playing with layers of source material. Office supplies. Cheap, abundant, and available resources. Allow for mistakes. Rapid prototyping. Rapid experimentation. Visible process. No outcome. A patchwork history. Impressions. Amateur historian. Curious observer. Gatherer. Pick and choose. Create more questions. Partial image. Unresolved. My hope is that the viewer finds some bit of interesting information that they may or may not explore further. I don’t want to even try to present a full picture of the history of Green River. I want to present fragments. I want to tell a story with other people’s facts. I want to tell a story with stories that other people told using other people’s facts. 

This art show might need some better graphic design, wouldn’t you say?

This art show might need some better graphic design, wouldn’t you say?

Art? Design? Or both? Discuss.
mcad-gd:

100 page publication made entirely with photo copier based around Bourriaud’s essay on Post Production by Josh Manoles (2013), Publication Design [NK]

Art? Design? Or both? Discuss.

mcad-gd:

100 page publication made entirely with photo copier based around Bourriaud’s essay on Post Production by Josh Manoles (2013), Publication Design [NK]

So…this is a very cool project. We’ll reference it throughout the term, particularly when we’re talking about design and community, and design and place. And cities! But it’s also a good one for talking about design and art.

Stephen Powers, or ESPO, is graffiti writer and signpainter who has been making this series of text-based urban mural projects across the world. He’s reclaiming the visual landscape, one giant word painting at a time. Much of his work straddles borders and asks questions.

How is this art? How is it design? (And for later in the term, how is it community service? How is it participatory?) 

Oooh man, it’s a good project. This picture is from A Love Letter to Philadelphia. See also A Love Letter to Brooklyn

Art project? Product design? Conceptual messaging? Typesetting? You tell me.

Art project? Product design? Conceptual messaging? Typesetting? You tell me.

Miranda July uses a lot of typography and writing in her work, and understands the importance of design decisions in communicating clearly.
andrearaijer:

Miranda July, Eleven Heavy Things, MOCA Pacific Design Center on Flickr.

Miranda July uses a lot of typography and writing in her work, and understands the importance of design decisions in communicating clearly.

andrearaijer:

Miranda July, Eleven Heavy Things, MOCA Pacific Design Center on Flickr.

Sister Corita Kent made work along the permeable borders between art and design…I highly encourage you to watch this short trailer for Become a Microscope, a documentary about her from director Aaron Rose.

Keith Sharwath is another maker who walks the line between designer and artist. Take a look at his work. Why might you consider him to be an artist? Why might you consider him to be a designer? Does it have to do with his methods, his mediums? Or maybe the contexts where we find his work?

Keith Sharwath is another maker who walks the line between designer and artist. Take a look at his work. Why might you consider him to be an artist? Why might you consider him to be a designer? Does it have to do with his methods, his mediums? Or maybe the contexts where we find his work?

I’m very excited to talk about both of these project—Cite to Excite and Justin’s piece— during our week on design and art.
So many things at once!
citetoexcite:

“Every landscape is a hermetic narrative” -Lucy Lippard
Now we’re rollin’. Today’s entry is from a great designer I’ve had the pleasure to get to know over the past year…Justin Flood. He’s worked pretty closely with some of the people in my MFA program, designing great pieces like this.
Here’s his explanation for his contribution for Cite to Excite:

Hi Jason,I’ve been lucky enough spend this last week with the good folks at the Epicenter, a resource center for affordable housing and small businesses and a hub for community based art, design and architecture projects in Green River, Utah.It was pretty amazing to witness the work of a small group of young professionals so committed to and engaged with their place and community on so many levels. Green River has a population of just 953 and this creates an interesting, intimate (and sometimes overly intimate) dynamic. Folks know their neighbors, they know their mayor, they know the postal workers and the servers at the diner. In a bigger city, community can feel like more of a concept than a reality, but on such a small scale the sense of community is unavoidable. This creates a dynamic which is both wonderful and warm and potentially challenging for an outsider.In my time in Green River the Epicenter crew attended a monthly meeting with the city council and the chamber of commerce. We spoke with folks in neighboring cities about approaches to community and business development. The organization is in the midst of constructing a Habitat for Humanity house as well as several design projects for local businesses: everything from creating menus and online presence to painting exterior signage and drafting site plans for a new fire department building.I spent one of my final days taking a series of these funky photos in the desert with my new friend and epicenter co-founder Jack Forinash. It was a fun, intuitive and experimental project with no real final product in mind, so I thank you for giving the photo a place to exist. It think its a pretty fitting pairing with the quote from Lucy Lippard’s The Lure of the Local, a text which I’ve been enamored with since the author’s inspiring PASPMLS lecture in October.Best,Justin

I’m very excited to talk about both of these project—Cite to Excite and Justin’s piece— during our week on design and art.


So many things at once!

citetoexcite:

“Every landscape is a hermetic narrative” -Lucy Lippard

Now we’re rollin’. Today’s entry is from a great designer I’ve had the pleasure to get to know over the past year…Justin Flood. He’s worked pretty closely with some of the people in my MFA program, designing great pieces like this.

Here’s his explanation for his contribution for Cite to Excite:

Hi Jason,

I’ve been lucky enough spend this last week with the good folks at the Epicenter, a resource center for affordable housing and small businesses and a hub for community based art, design and architecture projects in Green River, Utah.

It was pretty amazing to witness the work of a small group of young professionals so committed to and engaged with their place and community on so many levels. Green River has a population of just 953 and this creates an interesting, intimate (and sometimes overly intimate) dynamic. Folks know their neighbors, they know their mayor, they know the postal workers and the servers at the diner. In a bigger city, community can feel like more of a concept than a reality, but on such a small scale the sense of community is unavoidable. This creates a dynamic which is both wonderful and warm and potentially challenging for an outsider.

In my time in Green River the Epicenter crew attended a monthly meeting with the city council and the chamber of commerce. We spoke with folks in neighboring cities about approaches to community and business development. The organization is in the midst of constructing a Habitat for Humanity house as well as several design projects for local businesses: everything from creating menus and online presence to painting exterior signage and drafting site plans for a new fire department building.

I spent one of my final days taking a series of these funky photos in the desert with my new friend and epicenter co-founder Jack Forinash. It was a fun, intuitive and experimental project with no real final product in mind, so I thank you for giving the photo a place to exist. It think its a pretty fitting pairing with the quote from Lucy Lippard’s The Lure of the Local, a text which I’ve been enamored with since the author’s inspiring PASPMLS lecture in October.

Best,

Justin

The Thing Quarterly is an interesting intersection of art, design and commerce. Check it out: http://www.thethingquarterly.com

The Thing Quarterly is an interesting intersection of art, design and commerce. Check it out: http://www.thethingquarterly.com

Hey guys!
This is a video that corresponds well with the reading we did for this week. We read the introduction to the exhibition, and this video walks you through the exhibition and the process it took to mount it. 

If you didn’t do your reading, you’re in luck: you can watch it.

art470:

An overview / process discussion of last year’s Graphic Design: Now in Production exhibit from the Walker Art Center.

An interesting rumination on the significance of objects…pulling from art AND design, I’d argue!
significobs:


For the last 15 years, artist Conrad Bakker has been working on a series of Untitled Projects that complicate, reflect on and celebrate the life of objects.
Bakker creates hand-carved and painted facsimiles of familiar objects, from mid-century modernist furniture to garage-sale collectibles. The artist then inserts these painted, wooden “decoys” into real markets, from eBay auctions and mail-order catalogues to pyramid schemes and spam sales websites.
For Untitled Project: Seasonal Economies, Bakker responds to Vermont’s seasonal and local marketplaces. Here, maple sugaring, fall foliage tour packages and vintage Vermont collectibles are considered in relation to other markets, from barter systems to dollar stores.

More: BCA Center | Conrad Bakker

An interesting rumination on the significance of objects…pulling from art AND design, I’d argue!

significobs:

For the last 15 years, artist Conrad Bakker has been working on a series of Untitled Projects that complicate, reflect on and celebrate the life of objects.

Bakker creates hand-carved and painted facsimiles of familiar objects, from mid-century modernist furniture to garage-sale collectibles. The artist then inserts these painted, wooden “decoys” into real markets, from eBay auctions and mail-order catalogues to pyramid schemes and spam sales websites.

For Untitled Project: Seasonal Economies, Bakker responds to Vermont’s seasonal and local marketplaces. Here, maple sugaring, fall foliage tour packages and vintage Vermont collectibles are considered in relation to other markets, from barter systems to dollar stores.

More: BCA Center | Conrad Bakker