Posts tagged GOOD Ideas for Cities

GOOD Ideas for Cities: Supporting Neighborhood Public Schools in Portland

Here’s a project from the Portland version of GOOD Ideas for Cities, back in February. This one is by a team from Widen+Kennedy, building support for neighborhood schools.

Documentation of the GOOD Ideas for Portland event and student presentations at ADX on March 16.

Thank you to Ryan Bush and Justin Flood for these photographs!

See more here.

GOOD Ideas for Cities: Team Good Times

For their final project in Nicole Lavelle’s Design Thinking class at Portland State University, student teams identified, researched and designed solutions to urban challenges unique to Portland. In conjunction with GOOD Ideas for Cities, the students presented their solutions at a public event called GOOD Ideas for Portland. This series of posts documents those presentations. Find more information about the project and event here!

Team: Team Good Times
Members: Corbin Lamont, Gregor Holzmann, Collin May

Challenge: Portlanders hibernate. Parks and spaces that are bustling with activity during the summer are almost vacant for more half the year. What can we do to bring the community together during winter for safe, fun, all-ages events?

Solution: Team Good Times looked to themselves and their friends for inspiration for their urban challenge: Portland is wet, cold and dreary in the winter. Most of us stay inside and watch Netflix. What could get people out into Portland during the soggy winter months? The team devised a modular tent system to create dry, heated spaces within some of the city’s many parks. The tents would pop up in partnership with local businesses, who would care for the indoor parks in exchange for the use of the space. Free haircuts, poetry workshops, dinner parties and study hours are just a few of the uses Team Good Times proposed for their series of tent parks.

Presentation: See the complete presentation after the jump!

GOOD Ideas for Portland: Team Transportation

For their final project in Nicole Lavelle’s Design Thinking class at Portland State University, student teams identified, researched and designed solutions to urban challenges unique to Portland. In conjunction with GOOD Ideas for Cities, the students presented their solutions at a public event called GOOD Ideas for Portland. This series of posts documents those presentations. Find more information about the project and event here!

Team: Team Transport
Members: Alie Kouzoukian, Ruben Cadena, Gavin Van Houten

Challenge: Trimet is facing an enormous budget shortfall. Reductions are being planned for September 2012 that will affect all aspects of the public transportation system, impacting many Portland citizens. How can revenues be increased to make sure that Trimet can continue to provide affordable and reliable service for all? 

Solution: Team Transport embarked on a rigorous research process, engaging the public to seek opinions and gauge impact of public transportation in Portland . They approached their challenge with a  three-tiered solution. First, they suggested improving the experience of the ride by making Trimet FUN. Vending machines, ride free days and wifi on all trains would make riding the bus more enjoyable. Second, they devised a series of incentive-based approaches to encourage more riders, rethinking the function of the ticket. And finally…the blackout! Team Transport proposed taking away service for one day to highlight the importance of a functioning public transportation system in the city. They argued: “Sometimes, you only know the value of something when it is taken away.”

Presentation: See the complete presentation after the jump!

GOOD Ideas for Portland: Team Rescue

For their final project in Nicole Lavelle’s Design Thinking class at Portland State University, student teams identified, researched and designed solutions to urban challenges unique to Portland. In conjunction with GOOD Ideas for Cities, the students presented their solutions at a public event called GOOD Ideas for Portland. This series of posts documents those presentations. Find more information about the project and event here!

Team: Team Rescue
Members: Paige Lehmann, Jesse Weeg, Yoshimi Kawabata

Challenge: Portland’s Emergency Alert system relies heavily on telecommunications and, while their last alert test was successful, it took twice as long as predicted. At the same time, few Portlanders are prepared for an emergency. How can we both improve Portland’s alert system and prepare our community in case an emergency strikes? 

Solution: Team Rescue took on the challenge of preparing Portlanders for a natural disaster as well as thinking about improvements to the city-wide disaster alert system. Using the existing infrastructure of the Trimet public transportation system, Team Rescue transformed busses and trains into mobile rescue units. They designed a summer festival on the waterfront wherein the cost of admission gave each attendee an emergency preparedness kit. The team wrapped up their presentation by handing out checklists to the crowd to help them prepare their own kits for a natural disaster.

Presentation: See the complete presentation after the jump!

GOOD Ideas for Portland: Front Yard Project

For their final project in Nicole Lavelle’s Design Thinking class at Portland State University, student teams identified, researched and designed solutions to urban challenges unique to Portland. In conjunction with GOOD Ideas for Cities, the students presented their solutions at a public event called GOOD Ideas for Portland. This series of posts documents those presentations. Find more information about the project and event here!


Team: The Front Yard Project
Members
Joel Stein, Lyndsay Ediger, Nathan Sonenfeld

Challenge: The Willamette River is an attractive natural feature of Portland. It runs right through our city, but still isn’t a source of local pride or a site for activity. How then, do we turn the Willamette River into Portland’s “front yard,” an inspiring place of community for Portlanders to use and socialize with others?

SolutionThe Front Yard project looked at the Willamette River as a site for engagement, and set out to understand how to increase the value of the beautiful natural feature in the hearts and minds of Portlanders. Their solution proposed a number of alternative uses for the river, each designed to get more people to the water. Floating gardens, swing sets, water taxis and a system of lights would, they argued, get instill a sense of civic pride in the average Portlander.

Presentation: See the complete presentation after the jump!

GOOD Ideas for Portland: Bags of Fun

For their final project in Nicole Lavelle’s Design Thinking class at Portland State University, student teams identified, researched and designed solutions to urban challenges unique to Portland. In conjunction with GOOD Ideas for Cities, the students presented their solutions at a public event called GOOD Ideas for Portland. This series of posts documents those presentations. Find more information about the project and event here!

Team: Bags of Fun
Members: Andy Moser, Doug Sherwood, Devin Courtright

Challenge: Many communities have worked hard to outlaw single-use plastic bags, yet people are still using them. Just one person reusing a bag for their lifetime could keep 22,000 plastic bags out of the landfill. Changing habits is hard. How do we help people shift their behavior and reuse bags?

Solution: Bags of Fun approached their challenge with humor, engaging audiences of all ages. In order to instill good habits in youth, the Bags of Fun team created a campaign based on Bagman, a super hero with a bag for a head. Bagman encourages kids to bring bags with them when they leave the house, and to nag their parents to do the same. The team developed games for kids to pick up trash, framed under the guise of destroying the evil Dr. Plasto and his plastic bag minions. Partnerships with local elementary schools to offer parents and kids incentives rounded out the proposal.

Presentation: See the complete presentation after the jump!

I’m pleased to announce our panel line-up for the GOOD Ideas for Portland event coming up THIS WEDNESDAY!
We’ll have…
Carl Alviani, Writer, ZIBA DesignMathew Foster, Multidisciplinary CreativeSarah Mirk, Author, News writer at Portland MercuryBelin Liu, Creative Engineer at Atelier AceMorgan O’Hara, Candidate, PNCA MFA in Collaborative Design
…to give live feedback to all of the presenting groups! Thank you everyone for participating.
Super exciting. Can’t wait.
Remember, March 14! Drinks at 6:30, event at 7! At ADX! Everyone is invited. More information about the event and program here.

I’m pleased to announce our panel line-up for the GOOD Ideas for Portland event coming up THIS WEDNESDAY!

We’ll have…

Carl Alviani, Writer, ZIBA Design
Mathew Foster, Multidisciplinary Creative
Sarah Mirk, Author, News writer at Portland Mercury
Belin Liu, Creative Engineer at Atelier Ace
Morgan O’Hara, Candidate, PNCA MFA in Collaborative Design

…to give live feedback to all of the presenting groups! Thank you everyone for participating.

Super exciting. Can’t wait.

Remember, March 14! Drinks at 6:30, event at 7! At ADX! Everyone is invited. More information about the event and program here.

Here’s the press release for the March 14 event! Share it all over! Invite your friends, invite your classmates.
For immediate release: 
Portland State University’s graphic design program is proud to present GOOD Ideas for Portland, an evening of ideas to improve our city presented as part of the GOOD Ideas for Cities initiative.  The evening will also feature a lecture from Alissa Walker, design writer and host of GOOD Ideas for Cities.
WHEN Wednesday, March 14. Doors at 6:30pm, event at 7pm. WHERE ADX, 417 SE 11th Ave. Portland, OR 97214
Students in the Design Thinking course at PSU have worked to identify, research and tackle pressing urban challenges specific to Portland. Alissa Walker will join the evening as moderator and will also lecture on her work. A panel of urban leaders, local journalists, designers and creative professionals will offer live feedback on the students’ ideas.
This event is presented as a component of the GOOD Ideas for Cities initiative, a partnership between GOOD and CEOs for Cities, generously supported by ArtPlace. Additional partners include PSU.GD, the Friends of Graphic Design student group, and ADX.
The event is open to the public and free to attend. Refreshments will be provided, and other city-based student work from the design department will be on display.
For more information, see www.designthinkingpsu.tumblr.com/goodideas
Questions? Contact Nicole Lavelle at nlavelle@pdx.edu.

Here’s the press release for the March 14 event! Share it all over! Invite your friends, invite your classmates.

For immediate release:

Portland State University’s graphic design program is proud to present GOOD Ideas for Portland, an evening of ideas to improve our city presented as part of the GOOD Ideas for Cities initiative. The evening will also feature a lecture from Alissa Walker, design writer and host of GOOD Ideas for Cities.

WHEN Wednesday, March 14. Doors at 6:30pm, event at 7pm.
WHERE ADX, 417 SE 11th Ave. Portland, OR 97214

Students in the Design Thinking course at PSU have worked to identify, research and tackle pressing urban challenges specific to Portland. Alissa Walker will join the evening as moderator and will also lecture on her work. A panel of urban leaders, local journalists, designers and creative professionals will offer live feedback on the students’ ideas.

This event is presented as a component of the GOOD Ideas for Cities initiative, a partnership between GOOD and CEOs for Cities, generously supported by ArtPlace. Additional partners include PSU.GD, the Friends of Graphic Design student group, and ADX.

The event is open to the public and free to attend. Refreshments will be provided, and other city-based student work from the design department will be on display.

For more information, see www.designthinkingpsu.tumblr.com/goodideas

Questions? Contact Nicole Lavelle at nlavelle@pdx.edu.

GOOD ideas: Doug, Andy, & Devin

Sup gang,

Here’s a few ideas us three dudes have been tossing around:

  ☞ OLD TOWN CHINA TOWN

The old town/Chinatown disctrict of Portland is in serious danger of losing all of its culture and charm and rapidly becoming just another Portland neighborhood (in this case, more stale Pearl District flash-in-the-pan yuppy elitist rich white liberal yadda yadda). What can we do to save this historic hub of Portland before it becomes a cultureless zone just like Lair Hill and North Williams have been gentrified in the past few decades? How can we do this as a collective of mostly caucasians, without seeming offensive at the same time?

A few ideas we’ve come up with are seasonal block parties, going all out with Chinese dragons in the street. Hanging strings of Chinese lanterns across 5th street, the spine of the area. Instead of pedicabs, why not actual rickshaws? The boundary street signs on Burnside and Broadway could feature some Mandarin script to give you a better idea of the hood you’re about to enter.

Then there is the whole issue of the disgusting night life that has taken over the area, all catering to your average lowest common denominator citizen. Vandalsiam and drug-related crimes are up in the area largely due in part to the transformation this neighborhood takes during the evening hours. How can we keep this scene alive going for those who “depend” on it (businesses and alcoholics), but also make it more family-friendly so others can visit the neighborhood in those hours?

☞ BUS STOPS

Portland rains a lot. We all know that. Why is it, then, that at least 50% of Trimet’s bus stops are unsheltered, and additionally offer little to NO seating? And even the stops that are sheltered are unsightly and uncomfortable to sit on. How can we re-approach this situation to make waiting for the bus less daunting?

☞ NIGHT LIFE

The night life in Portland is largely centered around the consumption of alcohol. What are there for sober people and underage kids to do? Can we devise a strategy to get people who cannot, do not, or wish to not partake in this lifestyle?

PORTLAND STATE

PSU is a great school. We all loave it. But as it is mostly a commuter school, sometimes us students feel a bit left out (this DOES NOT include the art and/or Graphic Design department, FYI) of the entire going-ons of the school. What sort of campaign can we devise to give this school a greater sense of community, making all students feel in the loop and more participatory in extracurricular activities?

REUSABLE BAGS

Reusable grocery bags are seemingly everywhere. But they should be obviously everywhere. There are still discarded plastic and paper bags lining the gutters all over town. How can we raise awareness and motivate everybody in the city to start using reusable bags for ALL types of shopping?

Nathan, Lyndsay, and Joel: GOOD Ideas/Challenges

I. Food & Kids - How do you get kids to eat healthier by their own accord?

II. Waste - How can we reduce food waste in Portland?

III. Willamette River - The Willamette River is now safe to swim in, but it has not been able to shed the “yuck” factor. How do you change Portlanders relationship to the Willamette so that it becomes an integral component of the the civic culture, and a source of local pride?

IV. Cultural Cohesiveness - How do you better integrate immigrants into the larger fabric of Portland?

V. Homeless - How can you assist homeless people to reenter society in an easier, simpler and more harmonious way?

VI. The Landscape of Urban Ecology - How do we preserve, maintain and reintegrate nature into the larger urban ecosystem?

VII.  Global City, Global Citizens, Global Knowledge, Global Communication - Portland aspires to be a global, world-class city. This requires global citizens; therefore, how do we help develop citizens that “think globally, act locally,” sophisticated yet also committed to locality? This also requires open networks of communication and knowledge: how can the city enable citizens to be able to transcend the hyperspecialization of our cities into something that resembles a “crowdsourced city?”

Tomorrow, we welcome Alissa Walker to class!
Alissa is a writer, walker and creator and host of GOOD Ideas for Cities, the event taking place tomorrow night. 
You can find Alissa’s articles at gelatobaby.com, her online headquarters. Her topics include design, urbanism, and community art, and she’s a staunch supporter of public transportation and city exploration. She was named a USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism fellow in 2011 for her writing on design and urbanism. These are some of my favorite pieces of her writing:

Women in Industrial Design: Where My Ladies At?
Real World Studio (about Project M!)
The Fake Freeway Sign That Became A Real Public Service
A Generation of Emerging Designers Who Design With Purpose (profiles of Candy Chang and Bobby Martin)
How L.A.’s New “Farmers Field” Football Stadium Could Boost Urban Agriculture

You can also peruse her lovely, bright Flickr stream full of documentation of life in sunny Los Angeles. 
We’re so lucky to have her visit our class and work on our second class project with us!
Be ready in class tomorrow with your Reading the Human Landscape project documentation, and be ready to embark into the world to do some more first-hand research!

Tomorrow, we welcome Alissa Walker to class!

Alissa is a writer, walker and creator and host of GOOD Ideas for Cities, the event taking place tomorrow night. 

You can find Alissa’s articles at gelatobaby.com, her online headquarters. Her topics include design, urbanism, and community art, and she’s a staunch supporter of public transportation and city exploration. She was named a USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism fellow in 2011 for her writing on design and urbanism. These are some of my favorite pieces of her writing:

Women in Industrial Design: Where My Ladies At?

Real World Studio (about Project M!)

The Fake Freeway Sign That Became A Real Public Service

A Generation of Emerging Designers Who Design With Purpose (profiles of Candy Chang and Bobby Martin)

How L.A.’s New “Farmers Field” Football Stadium Could Boost Urban Agriculture

You can also peruse her lovely, bright Flickr stream full of documentation of life in sunny Los Angeles. 

We’re so lucky to have her visit our class and work on our second class project with us!

Be ready in class tomorrow with your Reading the Human Landscape project documentation, and be ready to embark into the world to do some more first-hand research!

Dates for out-of-class activities

As per some requests in class, here is a reminder of the dates for activities that will take place out of class time.

I understand that work or other classes can get in the way, but hopefully with five and ten weeks notice, you will be able to request time off from work and arrange with your professors to miss a class. If you need me to write a note to your boss or teacher, let me know.

Thursday, February 16
GOOD Ideas for Cities: Portland
At Ziba Design, 910 NW Marshall. Doors at 6pm, event at 7pm.
Free event, but you must RSVP online. I will post the link to RSVP when it goes up next week. 

Wednesday, March 14
GOOD Ideas for Portland: Student presentations of final projects
and Friends of Graphic Design present Show and Tell: Alissa Walker lecture
At ADX, 417 SE 11th Ave. Event at 6pm.