Posts tagged Design and process

Axioms for Reading The Landscape

As we LOOK at the urban environment around us, here is a set of axioms (or “truths”) to guide our looking.

l-o-o-k-l-o-o-k:

1. THE AXIOM OF LANDSCAPE AS CLUE TO CULTURE The man-made landscape – the ordinary run-of-the-mill things that humans have created and put upon the earth – provides strong evidence of the kind of people we are, and were, and are in process of becoming. In other words, the culture of any nation is unintentionally reflected in its ordinary vernacular landscape. 

2. THE AXIOM OF CULTURAL  UNITY AND LANDSCAPE EQUALlTY  Nearly all items in human landscapes reflect culture in some way. There are almost no exceptions. Furthermore, most items in the human landscape are no more and no less important than other items -  in terms of their role as clues to culture.

3. THE AXIOM OF COMMON THINGS Common landscapes – however important they may be – are by their nature hard to study by conventional academic means. The reason is negligence, combined with snobbery.

4. THE HISTORIC AXIOM In trying to unravel the meaning of contemporary landscapes and what they have to “say” about us as Americans, history matters. That is, we do what we do, and make what we make because our doings and our makings are inherited from the past. 

5. THE GEOGRAPHIC (OR ECOLOGIC) AXIOM Elements of a cultural landscape make little cultural sense if they are studied outside their geographic (i.e., locational) context.

6. THE AXIOM OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL Most cultural landscapes are intimately related to physical environment. Thus, the reading of cultural landscape also presupposes some basic knowledge of physical landscape.

7. THE AXIOM OF LANDSCAPE OBSCURITY Most objects in the landscape – although they convey all kinds of “messages” – do not convey those messages in any obvious way. The landscape does not speak to us very clearly. At a very minimum, one must know what kinds of questions to ask.

Source

My friend Megan teaches design in Detroit, and here is some mapping/thinking/process her students did. Post-Its for the win!
morethanthisblog:

Today, Here 10/12/12: Students mapping/rethinking vacancy at Detroit Works.

My friend Megan teaches design in Detroit, and here is some mapping/thinking/process her students did. Post-Its for the win!

morethanthisblog:

Today, Here 10/12/12: Students mapping/rethinking vacancy at Detroit Works.

Look! This is an exhibition about PROCESS!

p-exclamation:

Exhibition views of “Process 01: Joy”, September 2012

When the outcome drives the process we will only ever go to where we’ve already been. If process drives outcome we may not know where we’re going, but we will know we want to be there.
Bruce Mau (via charlottexcsullivan)
Project H is a humanitarian design non-profit based in Berkeley, California. One of their major projects is Studio H, a high-school build/design program. They have this to say about their design process in the classroom:

Students will learn through a non-linear design process, which includes ethnographic research, generation of multiple (sometimes crazy!) ideas, development of a few of those ideas into workable concepts, prototyping of those potential solutions, iterative refinement, and finally the construction and implementation of the solution. The process is messy, creative, surprising, and human-centered, resulting in solutions that emerge from need and community interest rather than schematic form-making. An iterative process (which usually includes multiple rounds of prototyping-refining), distills concepts into working solutions through testing and user feedback.

Read more.

Project H is a humanitarian design non-profit based in Berkeley, California. One of their major projects is Studio H, a high-school build/design program. They have this to say about their design process in the classroom:

Students will learn through a non-linear design process, which includes ethnographic research, generation of multiple (sometimes crazy!) ideas, development of a few of those ideas into workable concepts, prototyping of those potential solutions, iterative refinement, and finally the construction and implementation of the solution. The process is messy, creative, surprising, and human-centered, resulting in solutions that emerge from need and community interest rather than schematic form-making. An iterative process (which usually includes multiple rounds of prototyping-refining), distills concepts into working solutions through testing and user feedback.

Read more.

Corbin Lamont makes these maps sometimes, tracing the major components of her day.
PROCESS! She is documenting process. A good way to look back on what she’s been thinking about.

Corbin Lamont makes these maps sometimes, tracing the major components of her day.

PROCESS! She is documenting process. A good way to look back on what she’s been thinking about.

Sarah Baugh is a Portland-based designer whose work we’ll be referencing in this class. I encourage you to follow her Tumblr, which offers an interesting glimpse into her practice. Well, and it’s also called practice. I’m not sure if Sarah would call her self an artist, primarily, or a designer, primarily, but her creative output and process certainly seems to pull from both kinds of work.
This post is about process.
p-r-a-c-t-i-c-e:

When I first came here I had an idea of what I wanted to work on, but I also knew that, for me personally, it would be hard to know in advance, without ever being in Green River, what I wanted to work on. So I spent the first couple of weeks just kind of taking everything in. I actually felt a little overwhelmed. There is just so much here with the landscape and the dynamics of a small town. I’m from a very rural place, but I’ve spent the last six years in an urban environment. So readjusting to that took a moment. I rode my bike around. I talked to melon farmers. I talked to melon pickers. I ate melons. I went to the library. I took part in what was happening here at Epicenter. I thought that I wanted to look at one aspect of life in Green River in depth. I thought that I wanted to look at farming, specifically melons, because they are so important here, economically yes, but they are also one of those things that bind people together here. It’s something everyone has in common. And I wanted to explore the relationship between melons and the physical environment. What factors made it possible for people to grow melons here and how has this ultimately shaped the experience of living in Green River and calling this place home?
But the more I got into this, the more I realized that I kept wanting to take a step back and that I didn’t want to be that specific or come to any type of conclusion. I wanted to do a project that mirrored my experience here. I realized that a month is a such a short time and I know so little. Everything was coming at me in little bits and pieces, from all these different directions. There was what I could see, the town itself and the surrounding landscape. All of this is new. There is what is happening now. I would get bits of stories here and there. And then there is everything that has happened here in the past. I began to get a picture of this place, but it was fragmented, and I knew it would never be anywhere near complete. 
So I began to go to the local archive. I just wanted to be surrounded by preexisting information. And I liked the fact that the archive, any archive, collects information and doesn’t necessary do anything with it. That’s not the point, the point is to keep this information from disappearing into the past and making it accessible to the public. So I’ve been gathering documents in the way that I had previously been experiencing this place physically. I want to put these things into a new context and hopefully see them in a new light. I want to present what I’ve found in a way that doesn’t overtly create a narrative, but still has these narrative threads hidden inside, kind of waiting to be uncovered, but not forcing any one version of events. I want to make copies of copies and kind of perpetuate this idea that the history of a place is indeed fragmented and a bit fuzzy and coming from all these different sources and each source has a point of view, even if it’s trying to be completely objective. 
This project is process driven. I want it to feel a little unfinished, using copies of copies and playing with layers of source material. Office supplies. Cheap, abundant, and available resources. Allow for mistakes. Rapid prototyping. Rapid experimentation. Visible process. No outcome. A patchwork history. Impressions. Amateur historian. Curious observer. Gatherer. Pick and choose. Create more questions. Partial image. Unresolved. My hope is that the viewer finds some bit of interesting information that they may or may not explore further. I don’t want to even try to present a full picture of the history of Green River. I want to present fragments. I want to tell a story with other people’s facts. I want to tell a story with stories that other people told using other people’s facts. 

Sarah Baugh is a Portland-based designer whose work we’ll be referencing in this class. I encourage you to follow her Tumblr, which offers an interesting glimpse into her practice. Well, and it’s also called practice. I’m not sure if Sarah would call her self an artist, primarily, or a designer, primarily, but her creative output and process certainly seems to pull from both kinds of work.

This post is about process.

p-r-a-c-t-i-c-e:

When I first came here I had an idea of what I wanted to work on, but I also knew that, for me personally, it would be hard to know in advance, without ever being in Green River, what I wanted to work on. So I spent the first couple of weeks just kind of taking everything in. I actually felt a little overwhelmed. There is just so much here with the landscape and the dynamics of a small town. I’m from a very rural place, but I’ve spent the last six years in an urban environment. So readjusting to that took a moment. I rode my bike around. I talked to melon farmers. I talked to melon pickers. I ate melons. I went to the library. I took part in what was happening here at Epicenter. I thought that I wanted to look at one aspect of life in Green River in depth. I thought that I wanted to look at farming, specifically melons, because they are so important here, economically yes, but they are also one of those things that bind people together here. It’s something everyone has in common. And I wanted to explore the relationship between melons and the physical environment. What factors made it possible for people to grow melons here and how has this ultimately shaped the experience of living in Green River and calling this place home?

But the more I got into this, the more I realized that I kept wanting to take a step back and that I didn’t want to be that specific or come to any type of conclusion. I wanted to do a project that mirrored my experience here. I realized that a month is a such a short time and I know so little. Everything was coming at me in little bits and pieces, from all these different directions. There was what I could see, the town itself and the surrounding landscape. All of this is new. There is what is happening now. I would get bits of stories here and there. And then there is everything that has happened here in the past. I began to get a picture of this place, but it was fragmented, and I knew it would never be anywhere near complete. 

So I began to go to the local archive. I just wanted to be surrounded by preexisting information. And I liked the fact that the archive, any archive, collects information and doesn’t necessary do anything with it. That’s not the point, the point is to keep this information from disappearing into the past and making it accessible to the public. So I’ve been gathering documents in the way that I had previously been experiencing this place physically. I want to put these things into a new context and hopefully see them in a new light. I want to present what I’ve found in a way that doesn’t overtly create a narrative, but still has these narrative threads hidden inside, kind of waiting to be uncovered, but not forcing any one version of events. I want to make copies of copies and kind of perpetuate this idea that the history of a place is indeed fragmented and a bit fuzzy and coming from all these different sources and each source has a point of view, even if it’s trying to be completely objective. 

This project is process driven. I want it to feel a little unfinished, using copies of copies and playing with layers of source material. Office supplies. Cheap, abundant, and available resources. Allow for mistakes. Rapid prototyping. Rapid experimentation. Visible process. No outcome. A patchwork history. Impressions. Amateur historian. Curious observer. Gatherer. Pick and choose. Create more questions. Partial image. Unresolved. My hope is that the viewer finds some bit of interesting information that they may or may not explore further. I don’t want to even try to present a full picture of the history of Green River. I want to present fragments. I want to tell a story with other people’s facts. I want to tell a story with stories that other people told using other people’s facts. 

Hey guys!
This is a video that corresponds well with the reading we did for this week. We read the introduction to the exhibition, and this video walks you through the exhibition and the process it took to mount it. 

If you didn’t do your reading, you’re in luck: you can watch it.

art470:

An overview / process discussion of last year’s Graphic Design: Now in Production exhibit from the Walker Art Center.

Hmm! Will you be an active part of your intervention? Does your project have a performative element to it? A large, text-heavy element?

Start thinking about what defines your project. What is its purpose? Its intention? It’s mode of delivery?

alecshao:

Endre Tot - Outdoor Tests (1980)

When the outcome drives the process we will only ever go to where we’ve already been. If process drives outcome we may not know where we’re going, but we will know we want to be there.

Bruce Mau (via charlottexcsullivan)

TOTALLY appropriate re: today’s class! Thanks for such a great discussion and collaborative brainstorm, you guys!

An excerpt from Lea Loo’s observation and documentation of bus stops around campus.

An excerpt from Lea Loo’s observation and documentation of bus stops around campus.

Yesterday was a good day for exploring. 

We shared aloud our experiences of observing the landscape after reading the “Streets” chapter from George’s Perec’s Species of Spaces and excerpts from David Byrne’s Bicycle Diaries, Rebecca Solnit’s Wanderlust, and John Stilgoe’s Outside Lies Magic. 

Everyone made varied, excellent observations, ranging from people-watching in Peninsula Park to tracking the dissipated light on the sidewalk in Northwest Portland, to one student’s search for a place completely absent of all typography. (Spoiler: he couldn’t find one in the city.)

I gave the class a walking tour of the remnants of South Portland, the historic neighborhood that existed on the site of PSU before urban renewal and the highway arrived. We crossed the highway and talked about the South Auditorium Urban Renewal District and Lawrence Halprin’s work on the Lovejoy Fountain. We kicked it in Lair Hill at the current Waldorf School/former Neighborhood House, saw the little Carnegie Library, old carriage houses, and Portland’s first synagogue (now a church). 

Someone said, “Man, art classes are way more fun than finance classes.” True. But why? We decided that’s because art classes are more about asking questions than finding answers. 

This week was all about design and process, and I’d like to think we engaged in a number of different kinds of creative processes (Experimental documentation over the weekend, Post-It brainstorming on Monday, neighborhood ramble on Wednesday).

And then, because it was July 11, we all got free Slurpees at 7-11.

Go Design Thinking!

Yesterday was a good day for exploring.

We shared aloud our experiences of observing the landscape after reading the “Streets” chapter from George’s Perec’s Species of Spaces and excerpts from David Byrne’s Bicycle Diaries, Rebecca Solnit’s Wanderlust, and John Stilgoe’s Outside Lies Magic.

Everyone made varied, excellent observations, ranging from people-watching in Peninsula Park to tracking the dissipated light on the sidewalk in Northwest Portland, to one student’s search for a place completely absent of all typography. (Spoiler: he couldn’t find one in the city.)

I gave the class a walking tour of the remnants of South Portland, the historic neighborhood that existed on the site of PSU before urban renewal and the highway arrived. We crossed the highway and talked about the South Auditorium Urban Renewal District and Lawrence Halprin’s work on the Lovejoy Fountain. We kicked it in Lair Hill at the current Waldorf School/former Neighborhood House, saw the little Carnegie Library, old carriage houses, and Portland’s first synagogue (now a church).

Someone said, “Man, art classes are way more fun than finance classes.” True. But why? We decided that’s because art classes are more about asking questions than finding answers.

This week was all about design and process, and I’d like to think we engaged in a number of different kinds of creative processes (Experimental documentation over the weekend, Post-It brainstorming on Monday, neighborhood ramble on Wednesday).

And then, because it was July 11, we all got free Slurpees at 7-11.

Go Design Thinking!

Another interesting look at process, this time at process as experimentation and iteration!

issuepress:

I really love this risograph test video from SPARE residency in Chicago! 

spareresidency:

Risograph Red Ink Printed on 19 Different Colors of Paper.

Do you all know Kate? She’s a big part of our graphic design department here at PSU, and she has a project that’s perfect for talking about design process. What Did You Buy Today is a project where she draws one thing she purchases, EVERY DAY. It’s all part of a larger project called Obsessive Consumption. 
theokbb:

Daily Purchase Drawing for 07.08.12 
Joy Brunch Club went to Miss Delta this sunday. 

Do you all know Kate? She’s a big part of our graphic design department here at PSU, and she has a project that’s perfect for talking about design process. What Did You Buy Today is a project where she draws one thing she purchases, EVERY DAY. It’s all part of a larger project called Obsessive Consumption

theokbb:

Daily Purchase Drawing for 07.08.12 

Joy Brunch Club went to Miss Delta this sunday. 

First Things First Manifesto(es)

Here are links to the readings for Monday.

Please read:

1964 First Things First Manifesto

2000 First Things First Manifesto

Design is About Democracy by Rick Poynor (an introduction to the 2000 version)

Remember that these links and links to all your other readings can be found here.