Posts tagged Design and community

Local Previews is a project very similar to the Hypothetical Development Organization that we looked at in class. To call attention to underused sites in the urban environment, a group called Freecell created these architectural renderings of possible futures for empty sites. “It’s a form of architectural graffiti,” they explain, “meant to capture people’s imagination and to challenge them to question the changes that are happening around them.”

Local Previews is a project very similar to the Hypothetical Development Organization that we looked at in class. To call attention to underused sites in the urban environment, a group called Freecell created these architectural renderings of possible futures for empty sites. “It’s a form of architectural graffiti,” they explain, “meant to capture people’s imagination and to challenge them to question the changes that are happening around them.”

An interesting project that combines design thinking, graphic design/signage/typography to have positive impact on a community. Is this an art project? A design project? Does it matter?
halfletterpress:

Visions for Chicago - A Highly Politicized Public Art Project 
This book was just released two days ago by our friends at Green Lantern Press and already we have copies in stock! Click here to pick one up. More details on the book and project:
“Visions for Chicago is a public art project taking place in front yards, empty lots and public spaces throughout Chicago, Illinois during a historic mayoral and city council election season. The question, “What is your vision for Chicago?” is important at this time because, for the first time in 20 years, the city’s balance of power is shifting. Both Mayor Daley and the city council he controlled are retiring. As such, the political culture of corruption, defeat and disengagement they encouraged can be transformed. But change doesn’t happen in the small window of time afforded by elections; it happens over long periods of time, as people acting collectively implement their strategic visions. Through macro and micro level intent, we can transform how we think, behave and relate to our each other and this city.
From November 2nd of 2010 until April 1st of 2011, blank signs were distributed to over 100 Chicagoans who are trying to make the city more livable in a myriad of ways. Signs were also distributed to students at Orr High School in West Humboldt Park and the project organizer, Daniel Tucker, placed signs in public spaces throughout the city. The signs and the sign makers were photographed and their work is presented here so that we can read their visions in relationship to other sign makers and our own visions.”
A great window into Chicago life and politics circa RIGHT NOW. 

An interesting project that combines design thinking, graphic design/signage/typography to have positive impact on a community. Is this an art project? A design project? Does it matter?

halfletterpress:

Visions for Chicago - A Highly Politicized Public Art Project 

This book was just released two days ago by our friends at Green Lantern Press and already we have copies in stock! Click here to pick one up. More details on the book and project:

“Visions for Chicago is a public art project taking place in front yards, empty lots and public spaces throughout Chicago, Illinois during a historic mayoral and city council election season. The question, “What is your vision for Chicago?” is important at this time because, for the first time in 20 years, the city’s balance of power is shifting. Both Mayor Daley and the city council he controlled are retiring. As such, the political culture of corruption, defeat and disengagement they encouraged can be transformed. But change doesn’t happen in the small window of time afforded by elections; it happens over long periods of time, as people acting collectively implement their strategic visions. Through macro and micro level intent, we can transform how we think, behave and relate to our each other and this city.

From November 2nd of 2010 until April 1st of 2011, blank signs were distributed to over 100 Chicagoans who are trying to make the city more livable in a myriad of ways. Signs were also distributed to students at Orr High School in West Humboldt Park and the project organizer, Daniel Tucker, placed signs in public spaces throughout the city. The signs and the sign makers were photographed and their work is presented here so that we can read their visions in relationship to other sign makers and our own visions.”

A great window into Chicago life and politics circa RIGHT NOW. 

The Alabamboo Make and Ride is a project I’ll share in class this week. It’s an interesting look at trying to use design to build social capital, community and awareness. And maybe also it has nothing to do with design at all.

The Alabamboo Make and Ride is a project I’ll share in class this week. It’s an interesting look at trying to use design to build social capital, community and awareness. And maybe also it has nothing to do with design at all.

Thoughts on design, community, and education

sarahbaugh:

what if design really was for everyone? what if a mobile design classroom rolled onto main street one summer evening, holding open enrollment for workshops? what if your typography course was held under a canopy of old growth redwoods rather than florescent lights? what if school wasn’t a static place, but one that traveled where it was needed?

—study partner, a teaching alliance and idea laboratory

!!!

This is an awesome collaborative project from Temporary Services and IC-98 called It Is Always Like This. It explores the mobility of communication and relies on participation from community members and passers by. Check out more of Temporary Services’ public projects here.
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Two page spread from Swop Projects, by Andrea Creuz & Lise Skou showing a project by IC-98 and Temporary Services

This is an awesome collaborative project from Temporary Services and IC-98 called It Is Always Like This. It explores the mobility of communication and relies on participation from community members and passers by. Check out more of Temporary Services’ public projects here.

halfletterpress:

Two page spread from Swop Projects, by Andrea Creuz & Lise Skou showing a project by IC-98 and Temporary Services

A great example from the Epicenter of how living and working in a community as designers can have positive impact for all involved.

epicenter:

(In honor of Taco Tuesday and blog posts with TMT [too much text], we’re posting this second post today regarding our local haunt, La Veracruzana. Enjoy.)

When asked “So what do y’all do on Friday nights?” we’re never quite sure what the answer is. Immediately after “Why Green River?” is typically a realization that there isn’t a ton of stuff to do around here on the weekend nights. Our contemporaries in San Francisco, Chicago, or Brooklyn (a visitor via Amtrak/inaugural Epicycles customer yesterday was one of these exact people asking these questions) are given options of various free music shows, museum galleries, or other nightlife. They have the luxury of knowing of something to do and deciding to stay home.

So, since we don’t ever have examples for how to answer the “so what do you guys do” question, we’re starting a new series: This is what I did on Friday night in Green River.

Let’s begin.

Friday 1 April 2011: Crew Members Justin, Jack, and Maria quit work at 4:12pm to head over to La Veracruzana, the Mexican restaurant with awesome tacos. Earlier that week, Justin and Jack offered to paint the front of the building, free of charge, in an effort to give better cues as to what the restaurant currently is and gain more business (note the confusion between the old Ben’s Cafe signs and the La Veracruzana signs in Exhibit 1).

Why does it matter to us to spend 4 hours painting? We’ll give you three reasons:

1. The food is extremely good.
2. The owner is pressured to offer “American” options because she has people coming in asking for cafe-style food, confused by the signage.
3. Painting is easy & colors bring attention. And they already had the paint from the text signage.

It really boils down to a self-interest: we want this place to stay open offering authentic Mexican food so we can continue to eat it.

AND, the existing siding already had an incredible opportunity to create slashes and arrows (two of our favorite symbols).

You aren’t able to see the zig zags up top being painted red, as we continued on into the darkness on ladders. You’ll just have to see this for yourselves. Surely no one will be confused anymore… unless they think it’s Italian.

At 8:38 Justin, Jack, and owner Elias, who joined us, were done. We went inside and were treated to a large meal and some recently acquired Dos Equis Ambar, in the presence of a large group from London who wandered in ( /were lured in by the red and green) a little earlier. We left at 10:08, the restaurant lights turning off as we biked away, proud of ourselves for being out in town until after “double digits.”

Today we’re happy to report Sara and Elias are very pleased with the new paint job and have said they have gotten many compliments. Plus, the American options have been removed from the menu. And when we were there for lunch today, the restaurant got a call from a local asking about the Taco Tuesday special. Lastly, we now have a small side job helping out there Saturday nights from 6pm to close, which we’ll share between us. BAM!

Breanne Trammell is currently an Artist in Residence at the Wassaic Project in Wassaic, New York. She has been working a local social group to do design work for their events. A great example of design for and with the community!breannetrammell:

Two recent posters for the Fire Dept. Ladies’ Auxiliary.

Breanne Trammell is currently an Artist in Residence at the Wassaic Project in Wassaic, New York. She has been working a local social group to do design work for their events. A great example of design for and with the community!
breannetrammell
:

Two recent posters for the Fire Dept. Ladies’ Auxiliary.

So…this is a very cool project. We’ll reference it throughout the term, particularly when we’re talking about design and community, and design and place. And cities! But it’s also a good one for talking about design and art.

Stephen Powers, or ESPO, is graffiti writer and signpainter who has been making this series of text-based urban mural projects across the world. He’s reclaiming the visual landscape, one giant word painting at a time. Much of his work straddles borders and asks questions.

How is this art? How is it design? (And for later in the term, how is it community service? How is it participatory?) 

Oooh man, it’s a good project. This picture is from A Love Letter to Philadelphia. See also A Love Letter to Brooklyn

Okay, so photographs of Skype calls are probably the most boring thing ever, but here’s another mega thank you to Maria Sykes and Chris Lezama from the Epicenter for beaming in yesterday to talk about designing for community. I’m really excited to hear more about how their new art and design internship program unfolds!

For more inspiring visuals, check out their website!

In thinking about design AS community, design FOR community, design WITH community, and (newly added to the list today!) design AT community, take a peek at Candy Chang's work. This is from the Before I Die project, but there are LOADS of others that are super fun to look at.

In thinking about design AS community, design FOR community, design WITH community, and (newly added to the list today!) design AT community, take a peek at Candy Chang's work. This is from the Before I Die project, but there are LOADS of others that are super fun to look at.

First Things First Manifesto(es)

Here are links to the readings for Monday.

Please read:

1964 First Things First Manifesto

2000 First Things First Manifesto

Design is About Democracy by Rick Poynor (an introduction to the 2000 version)

Remember that these links and links to all your other readings can be found here.

On Social Design

Class might be over but I’m still going to post interesting design-related things to this blog…

I’m going to visit Megan in Detroit next week and I’m excited for all the conversations I know we’ll have.

morethanthisblog:

I have a love/hate relationship with the term social design, mainly because, despite the fact I have no idea what it really means, I still find myself wielding it frequently in conversations with other designers and non-designers alike.

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EPICENTER: Community by Design

Read this!

epicenter:

Epicenter’s response to the blog post “Community by Design” from More/Than/This (Blog)™, re-blogged at the bottom of this post.

In regards to the question of, “Where does the community enter the design process?” This is our perception:

The point at which the community engages is in…

Here the Epicenter is visualizing space, graphically.
epicenter:

Green River Farmland
After a suggestion over dinner with our Board Member and partner Brooke Henderson, we’ve mapped out all the land that has been claimed for agriculture by local farmers, irrigated by the abundance of water provided by the river and man-made canal. The patchwork created is shown above (click on image for a higher resolution image).

Here the Epicenter is visualizing space, graphically.

epicenter:

Green River Farmland

After a suggestion over dinner with our Board Member and partner Brooke Henderson, we’ve mapped out all the land that has been claimed for agriculture by local farmers, irrigated by the abundance of water provided by the river and man-made canal. The patchwork created is shown above (click on image for a higher resolution image).