Posts tagged Design and process

Here is Cody’s documentation of Fourth of July, a collage of the fireworks he saw.

Here is Cody’s documentation of Fourth of July, a collage of the fireworks he saw.

Phil’s Fourth of July documentation took the form of a rendering of the Occupy Design logo, exemplifying something he’s focused on, finance reform. 

Phil’s Fourth of July documentation took the form of a rendering of the Occupy Design logo, exemplifying something he’s focused on, finance reform. 

Check out Ethan’s documentation of 4th of July!

(by Ethan Allen Smith)

jennilee:

john balderssari

jennilee:

john balderssari

Check out this lovely series of daily lunch drawings…these lovely ladies have an awesome project going. Think about how to give yourself restraints as you design your projects; it could yield great results!
b-sandwich:

Daily Lunch Drawing #17: Peas!

Check out this lovely series of daily lunch drawings…these lovely ladies have an awesome project going. Think about how to give yourself restraints as you design your projects; it could yield great results!

b-sandwich:

Daily Lunch Drawing #17: Peas!

Big time post-it brainstorming sesh in Design Thinking class today!!!

Big time post-it brainstorming sesh in Design Thinking class today!!!

Fourth of July documentation!

Tomorrow in class we’ll talk about nation/place branding, and developing visual acuity through active documentation.

Woohoo!

designedu:

This reminds me of the segment of the This American Life episode “Meet the Pros” in which David Rakoff talks with the Martha Stewart Crafts Department.
good:

Some people specialize in ideas, constantly scheming, iterating, finessing. I prefer doing. I don’t know what makes me want to make, but often the impulse strikes without warning. If I don’t satiate it immediately, it becomes a dull ache that lingers all day.
You’d think this would be a non-issue—after all, I’m lucky enough to be paid a salary to design all day. But increasingly I’ve realized that for people like me, one creative outlet isn’t enough.
Editorial design director Dylan Lathrop writes about why creative people need multiple outlets, whether writing or D&D.

designedu:

This reminds me of the segment of the This American Life episode “Meet the Pros” in which David Rakoff talks with the Martha Stewart Crafts Department.

good:

Some people specialize in ideas, constantly scheming, iterating, finessing. I prefer doing. I don’t know what makes me want to make, but often the impulse strikes without warning. If I don’t satiate it immediately, it becomes a dull ache that lingers all day.

You’d think this would be a non-issue—after all, I’m lucky enough to be paid a salary to design all day. But increasingly I’ve realized that for people like me, one creative outlet isn’t enough.

Editorial design director Dylan Lathrop writes about why creative people need multiple outlets, whether writing or D&D.

I am once again reminded that the real value in design exists in the process. It is here, where one discovers meaning. It is here where one, if they slow down long enough to identify it, enjoys new discovery, unwavering artistic integrity and if they’re really lucky, true innovation.
Excited to hear about your adventures into Portland! 
Bring pictures! Bring stories! I hope someone went to Tienda Santa Cruz.

Excited to hear about your adventures into Portland! 

Bring pictures! Bring stories! I hope someone went to Tienda Santa Cruz.

Design and Process: Week 3 wrap-up

Hey all, 

Last week we looked at different processes that designers use to make work. As we’ve been discussing, design exists in many formats and contexts, and the processes used to make such a diverse spread of work are also varied and plentiful.

We talked about the difference between “Design Thinking” and “thinking about design.” Do you think you could describe that difference if someone asked you? Try it out next time someone asks you about this class.

We talked about the different kinds of creative processes designers engage in. Did our discussions make you consider your own practice in a new light? Did you take a second look at your workspace? Did you reconsider how you might approach a design project?

We went on individual walks during class on Thursday to see if an every-day process could be fodder for creative thought. I’m looking forward to seeing your documentation of your experiences! *** Make sure to post your walk response to Tumblr before 9am Tuesday morning. Remember, this response can take whatever form you choose. Share some photographs. Write a short essay. Draw a picture. Make a comic. Scan the notes you took while you walked. Write a poem. Scan a piece of trash you picked up. Tell us the story of where you walked and what you saw.

What do I hope you gain from last week’s discussions and readings? I hope you understand that the PROCESS is just as important (if not more so!) than the PRODUCT. We work in a production-oriented field, and it can be hard sometimes to value the time-consuming steps that a creative project can require. But if you can learn to value process, if you can learn to enjoy the experimentation and discovery that results from engaging with ideas and materials, you’ll see your investment reflected in your results.

Or, at least, you’ll be enjoying a process.

You guys RULED today during our ideation exercise. Thank you for putting so much effort into participating in class today. There was so much fresh, new content floating around. I hope you not only enjoyed it but had some new thoughts about your projects.

Give yourselves high fives! (I guess that’s just clapping?) Give yourselves some applause, then.

Moodboards

Also as promised, here is a link to a post I made for my other class about moodboards.

Once you complete your proposal, you will need to complete a moodboard for your project. This can contain inspiration from your chosen research topic, as well as other visual things that will help you shape the look of your project.

Read this post!

Project #1: Proposals

As promised in class today, here is some guidance for the proposals that are due on Thursday.

You will propose a project that is similar in concept or form to your chosen research topic.

Think of this as a project brief that you get to write yourself. You’re making yourself a road map that will guide you as you execute your project.

Your proposal must define:

  • The form of your project. What is it?
  • How you will make it. What materials will you use? What processes will you use?
  • Key concepts that are driving your project. What are some keywords that you’d use to describe it to someone else?
  • Your audience. Who is this project for?
  • A calendar/schedule for how you will proceed. Set yourself some deadlines. What are the steps you must take?
  • Finally, do you need any help from me or your classmates? Please define the external assistance you may or may not need. People power? Skill share? Information about resources? 

Please bring a hard copy of your project proposals to class to turn into me. As usual, they must be double-spaced. The format is up to you. Look at project briefs you’ve received in other classes. How do they organize the information? You can organize it according to the bulleted list above, if you want!

Remember: Project #1 is due on Tuesday, February 7. That gives you two weeks to execute your plan. Plot your time wisely! Stay on top of your schedule!

Email me with any questions. Good luck!

A beautiful example of how testing, testing, testing will yield just the result you hope for…or maybe something even better. If you limit your experimentation, you’ll only be missing out potential solutions.
randrenfrow:

neat. split fountain test prints.

A beautiful example of how testing, testing, testing will yield just the result you hope for…or maybe something even better. If you limit your experimentation, you’ll only be missing out potential solutions.

randrenfrow:

neat. split fountain test prints.